*For when you are put on hold…

Coed-y-paen, Wales

We came across this beauty when holidaying in Wales. The phone-box conversion speaks to what a friendly place we found South Wales to be.

*Tag line thanks to Laurence Prescott of Brisbane, Australia.

Square Eyes

Arrested Development (2013)

Breathless (1960)

Hard Sun (2017)

Hard Sun (2017)

Man in High Castle (2016)

Man in High Castle (2016)

Modern Family – Normandy Phone Booth magic trick (2017)

The Flash (2017)

Twin Peaks (2017)

Warehouse 13 (2011)

World on a Wire (1973)

 

 

UK

A couple of recent images from here in the UK. One is a standard, iconic shot another shows the new uses to which old rural boxes are being put to, and one from Barri Island, Wales:

Cambridge

Cressbrook, Peak District

Barri Island

New style UK phone box and more

I go to Finsbury Park, in north London, regularly and noticed the phone box  shown below had appeared since my last visit:

A few weeks later, just a couple of metres along from this box, appeared a freaky installation which I assume is a communication device.  I can’t call it a phone box as there is no box. What is it? If calling someone will you see their image in the long, thin screen? Feels a little Blade Runneresque.

 

Adopt a Kiosk Scheme

The Adopt a Kiosk scheme enables your community to retain its iconic red kiosk. It is open to the following bodies:

  • Recognised local authority (e.g. District/Borough Council)
  • Parish/Community/Town Council or equivalent
  • Registered charity or Community Interest Company
  • Private land owner. (Anyone who has one of our telephone boxes on their land)

The Adopt a Kiosk scheme has been successful in transforming unused payphone kiosks and preserves the heritage of the red kiosk, particularly in rural locations. We allow red kiosks to be adopted, subject to certain criteria such as low use and those not required for our own future plans.

Kiosks are “adopted as seen” and we won’t make improvements to them ahead of adoption. We also won’t be able to move kiosks to another location. We occasionally allow modern kiosks to be adopted in rural areas if required for specific purposes (for example to house a defibrillator) where there are no red ones available. Should your request relate to a kiosk in an urban area, we will normally carry out an individual assessment to see if adoption is possible. Just let the Adopt a Kiosk team have details of the kiosk in question and they will be able to confirm availability.

We can’t allow private individuals (unless they own the land where the kiosk is on) to adopt kiosks but our supplier X2 Connect do sell them to interested parties. For further information please click here.

Pink Floyd at the V&A

The recent Pink Floyd exhibition held at the V&A used the iconic British phone box through-out:

 

What happened to the boxes?

I travelled in Poland about 20 years ago and went again recently. Where have all the phone boxes gone? We stayed in the countryside and then spent a few days in Krakow and saw none during this time. Here is the Main Square in Krakow in 1997(?) …

And from the same spot in 2017…

 

(What is interesting is that there was a police vehicle in the recent shot and what looks like one in the earlier shot – some things don’t change.)

What I did see in place of where I might expect to see a phone box was a stand-alone ATM…

 

 

Canadian phones still bring in the money

Payphones Still Make Millions of Dollars 

From a report on Motherboard:

Disruption-y tech companies like Uber and Twitter are a big part of “the discourse” and our daily lives, but neither of them make any profit. You know what once-groundbreaking technology doesn’t have any problems making bank year after year? That’s right, it’s payphones. Most people now have a cell phone, so you may have wondered who still uses those rusted, quarter-eating boxes. As it turns out, a lot of people do. According to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s 2017 monitoring report, payphones in Canada made $22 million CAD in 2016 (this figure may not account for the cost of upkeep, but the CRTC has stated in the past that payphones are “financially viable at current rates.”) That’s spread out among nearly 60,000 payphones in the country, which made roughly $300 per phone over the course of the year. That’s at least a few calls per day, each. The US numbers are similar: The FCC reports that in 2015 payphones made $286 million, which is comparable for a population ten times the size of Canada’s.

Cross-post from Slash-dot.

The Leftovers

We recently finished watching season 3 of the excellent tv series ‘The Leftovers’. There were a couple of arty shots of phone boxes, set in my home nation of Australia. I like the added satellite dish on top of the phone in the second photo.

Stories on the radio

Click here for Radio 4 stories about phone boxes.

One covers the question ‘what happens to a phone box when it dies’ and the other looks at the memories people have of UK phone boxes.