London phone boxes

Click for a photographic essay on the internals of decaying phone boxes in London.

Covid-19 lockdown and the phone box

This article in the Guardian showes how relevant phone boxes still are to communities in the modern world. (A small piece of good news in a time when 98% of news articles just bring me down.)

Drum rolls, bread rolls and rolling wheels – the upside of lockdown

Susan Crawford, a founder of the phone box community food larder in Muthill, Perthshire, checks the provisions. Photograph: Jane Barlow/PA

It is heart warming to see every aspect of society transformed to join the effort against coronavirus, with Harry Potter buses turning into NHS shuttles, an old red phone box becoming a food hub, and an ancient water mill brought back into action to tackle the flour shortage…

Village in Scotland turns phone box into community larder

A disused red phone box has been transformed into a mini food hub, stocking groceries and other essentials for residents struggling with the coronavirus lockdown.

Muthill, a village in Perth and Kinross, Scotland, is home to 675 residents. Corinna Robertson and Susan Crawford decided to set up the “take what you need” service after realising just how badly the lockdown had hit some people.

“We realised this is worse than we thought. People are off work and have no income and it’ll take a while for them to get money through,” said Robertson, a 52-year-old garage worker who was recently furloughed.

The larder, which was set up on 9 April, is particularity useful for those who cannot drive and who might struggle to get to the nearby town of Crieff to stock up. “The response has been incredible. The local pub, which no longer has income, donated chocolate Easter lollies for kids,” she added. “It’s great community spirit.”

They have even considered keeping the hub open after the lockdown finishes to help people get back on their feet. “People might be in this predicament for a while, being behind with bills.”

Local residents use the community food larder in Muthill, near Crieff, Perthshire. Photograph: Jane Barlow/PA

For the full article click here: https://www.theguardian.com/news/2020/apr/15/drum-rolls-bread-rolls-and-rolling-wheels

Telephone Kiosk collection (7) – finale

Art connections

Banksy

Community spirit

A Welsh village is trying to save its beloved red telephone box from being scrapped because it helped protect them during World War II.

The phone box in the quiet village of Bryn-y-Gwenin, near Abergavenny, South Wales,, was used to warn of air raids.

Credit: David Davies

Now the villagers want BT to save the box because of its wartime role when it was “the main point of contact” for warnings of Nazi bombing raids.

The villagers have enlisted the help of Conservative MP David Davies in their campaign to save the phone box.

Mr Davies said keeping the phone box would preserve the village’s history as well as serving a practical purpose. He said: “Mobile signal in this part of rural Monmouthshire is intermittent and very poor at best, so the public telephone box is an essential village amenity for Bryn-y-Gwenin.

“It also serves Llanddewi Skirrid and the surrounding area. With the Skirrid mountain a popular spot for walkers and cyclists, the significance of the box is paramount in an emergency.

“BT claims the phone box has had very little use over a significant period of time. Calls may well be small in number but one day that call could be very important and potentially life-saving.”

Previous plans to decommission the box were successfully overturned in 2016 following a similar local campaign.

Resident Paul Webb said villagers “cherished” the box, which bears the Tudor Crown of King George VI.

“One of our villagers, Richard Cox, cleans it on a weekly basis and repaints it when necessary.” he said.

“The box has always been a proud landmark at the entrance to our village.  It is an iconic part of British heritage yet sadly, these red telephone boxes are getting more and more scare in the countryside.

“It has been stated in the past that if the phone itself was removed but the box remained then the villagers would be prepared to have a defibrillator installed as it would be a very strategic place for one to be available.”

The phone box is a K6 model, designed to commemorate the silver jubilee of King George V, and entering production in 1936.

It was originally connected to the village post office via a party line.

On Twitter, Mr Davies posted a video of himself at the phone box and surrounded by residents.  He said: “This phone box played a small role in defending Britain during WW2. It is being lovingly cleaned & maintained by a local resident. After decades of loyal@service @bt_uk want to scrap it.”

BT has launched a consultation period to determine the phone box’s future.

A spokesman for BT said: “Most people now have a mobile phone and calls made from our public telephones have fallen by around 90 per cent in the past decade.

“We consider a number of factors before consulting on the removal of payphones.”

Cross-post from The Telegraph

Screenshots: Covid 19 viewing

More screen time is ahead of me in the coming months. I’m normally don’t sit in front of the TV for too long but as I’m trying to do my civic duty and not leave the house, this will be difficult. Here’s a few to start the next phase with:

I like that in Supergirl we see a photo of a couple on someones phone with the indication that the photo was taken in the UK, thanks to the iconic, red phone box in the background.

Music box

I was listening to Radio 6 this morning and came half way into an interview with Pete Paphides. They were talking about his new book “Broken Greek”. What caught my ear was him talking about how, when he was young (I gather the ’70s as ABBA was mentioned) he would get money from his Mum to go to the phone box outside the fish and chip shop and listen to music. There was a 3 digit number you could ring that would play a different pop song every day. How fabulous.

Screenshots: Rewatching a favourite

With a new Wes Anderson movie coming out*, The French Dispatch, I thought I’d re-watch a favourite, The Royal Tenenbaums. There are quite of few scenes with telephones:

* Written Feb 2020, before Covid 19 ravaged the globe. And I thought I was about to see ‘The French Dispatch’. It still hasn’t come out (Oct 2020) although I did see a short for it at the cinema a week or so ago. It looks fabulous and I want to see it now!

Telephone Kiosk collection (6) – various

UK locations

Leeds
Holborn, London – being used as a menu board for a food stall
Margate