Tag Archives: rural

French TV

In English the show is called ‘Black Spot’ but although my French is not so good even I know ‘Zone Blanche’ translates as ‘White’ zone. It refers to the lack of communication signals in the town and forest. I find it curious that languages can refer to the same occurrence with a phrase that uses opposite terms.

I’m glad I caught this text. Indicates the way phone booths are going. In this story the locals shot at the telecoms men who came to dismantle it.

Northern Ireland

Bushmills Distillery

Giant’s Causeway
Belfast

Tin Star

I love this shot from Tin Star. There was no real need in the story line for this scene but the producers put it in anyway. Local art and phone boxes create powerful images.

 

Australia

I was recently sent this shot from a cousin:

Tilba, NSW

I just returned from a visit home to Australia and took these while I was away:

Fremantle, WA

Montville , QLD

*For when you are put on hold…

Coed-y-paen, Wales

We came across this beauty when holidaying in Wales. The phone-box conversion speaks to what a friendly place we found South Wales to be.

*Tag line thanks to Laurence Prescott of Brisbane, Australia.

UK

A couple of recent images from here in the UK. One is a standard, iconic shot another shows the new uses to which old rural boxes are being put to, and one from Barri Island, Wales:

Cambridge

Cressbrook, Peak District

Barri Island

The Leftovers

We recently finished watching season 3 of the excellent tv series ‘The Leftovers’. There were a couple of arty shots of phone boxes, set in my home nation of Australia. I like the added satellite dish on top of the phone in the second photo.

Quebec City, Canada

quebec-city-canada

Old City

On the road

On the road

Phone closures

This appeared in the ‘i’ newspaper yesterday (11 October 2016). Sign of the times:

20161012_090533

Which leads nicely onto this:

phone-wisdom

Box marks the spot

central phone box

BT installed its 100,000th payphone at Dunsop Bridge, Lancashire in 1992 and included a plaque to explain its significance. It reads:

“You are calling from the BT payphone that marks the centre of Great Britain.”

In fact, the phone is 4.2 miles (6.8 km) from the true centre. Postmaster and shop owner Phil Woodhead said the town did not capitalise on its status.

“There is only that payphone really… we haven’t put up big signs or anything like that. If this was a bigger town with more shops, then maybe we would do something. But because we are so small, there is really no-one to push it.”

Source: BBC News